About Wally and Kali:

When Wally looks for the path to love, he finds a naked yogini, a smiling guru, and a ruthless goddess lighting the way. Wally can't figure out how to transcend his life-long string of not quite right relationships. His latest mismatch introduces him to yoga, and while she's soon gone, Wally is hooked and books a vacation at an ashram. There Molly, naked and 20 years old, befriends him, then confounds his fatherly inclination toward her with a profession of love.

Available at Amazon.com in paperback and for Kindle readers and smartphones.

But it’s Molly’s mom, Jane who ends up taking Wally to the altar. Life is bliss for Jane and Wally; for Jane's teenage son Dink; and even for Molly, who is surprised by her attraction to another girl. Havoc ensues when Dink's girlfriend leaves him, and he falls under the torturous spell of unrequited desire, a torment reflected in an intertwined tale in the language of his job at the comic book store. Walt finds the challenge around this new kind of relationship — that with a son — the darkest he’s ever faced, and the whole family is pulled in. Enter Kali, goddess of transformation. A joyful guru gets Dink to yoga class, and a tantric yogini-- or is she a goddess?-- takes the entire family on an unexpected journey.

"This book was one of the most enjoyable reads ever, for me. I lean toward the classics when it comes to fiction. Wally and Kali is really brilliantly written. There is a beautiful rhythm and flow to Peter Ferko's writing. His characters are so fully constructed; the world he creates in this book completely enveloped me and I didn't want to leave it. I couldn't wait to return to it. I can't wait to read his future books." —Commenter on Amazon.com

About Peter

Peter Ferko is an author who draws on lifelong pursuits in yoga, art, and music. His novel Wally and Kali is a poignant, funny, sexy tale of love and family all set in the realm of New York City's vibrant yoga scene. Peter is a yoga master who teaches classes and teacher training at ISHTA Yoga, a well-known yoga studio in Manhattan and is co-director of The Table, a yoga and arts project in Brooklyn. Peter lives and works with fellow yogiraj, Wendy Newton, their ever-amusing dog, Mica, and the cat formerly known as Prince. Their son Chris makes delicious food for the folks in Portland, Maine.

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What’s going on…

JOIN ME On the yoga front:

  • Workshop: Man to Man, Yoga for the Average Guy. June 14 at ISHTA Yoga in NYC.
  • Come to class at ISHTA Yoga, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturday.
  • Come for a private lesson or tune-up. Email me at peter (at) peterferko.com. 
  • Peter is teaches ISHTA Yoga Teacher Training in Manhattan. Training is a transformative way to deepen your understanding of yoga, whether or not you want to teach.

On the writing front:

  • Wally and Kali is for sale at Amazon.com.
  • Peter's next novel, Incarnation is underway.
  • Available soon, Peter's new short novel, Black Hole of the Heart.

Latest Blog Posts

I’ve been doing a little research on James Bond for a new book (no not a spy thriller), and learned the name of the hat everyone has been wearing for the last four years: the trilby. Here’s a fun blog post about them, and why everyone shouldn’t be wearing them. Except, by the author’s critique, me.

Here’s a photo from the awesome web site, thesuitsofjamesbond.com
Sean Connery in a trilby

a short story, by Peter Ferko

On my subway car in the Nation’s Capital, I face ahead as a man behind resists belligerent calls from a fellow passenger to release the doors and much harrumphing from my car mates. The recorded voice once again presumes cooperation as it states, “Doors closing,” while in fact, they open, allowing a recently-coiffed man in a stylish — rather than the more typically conservative — blue wool coat to sneak in the doors ahead of me; then they shut again, catching the sneak by the arm like a strict aunt. (read more…)

I love the Paris Review’s interviews. Their tweets pull such juicy quotes that I want to read them all, and then the interviews are so good that I want to read all the authors’ books (which I usually haven’t).

Here’s a great answer from the interview with Elizabeth Hardwick:

 I don’t have many plots and perhaps as a justification I sometimes think: If I want a plot I’ll watch Dallas. I think it’s mood. No, I mean tone. Tone arrived at by language. I can’t write a story or an essay until I can, by revision after revision, get the opening tone right. Sometimes it seems to take forever, but when I have it I can usually go on. It’s a matter of the voice, how you are going to approach the task at hand. It’s all language and rhythm and the establishment of the relation to the material, of who’s speaking, not speaking as a person exactly, but as a mind, a sensibility.

I can relate to that ‘revision after revision’ piece. It helps you recognize what’s there only because it’s precious to you and what’s their because it’s important.

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